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Dedication of the Como Depot

          Thanks to the efforts of many organizations and individuals the Como depot has been restored to its former glory, circa 1900. A formal ceremony was held at “high noon” on Saturday, August 22nd, 2015 in conjunction with the 20th annual Boreas Pass Railroad Day. The depot was built in 1879 and abandoned by the railroad 58 years later in 1937. Through various owners and uses it received virtually no maintenance whatsoever. In 2008 when stabilization and restoration began it was near to total collapse. Today the restored depot is once again serving the community as a local history museum.


A large crowd gathered for the ceremony in front of the recently relaid track which will eventually extend all the way to the roundhouse.


Jennifer Orrego Charles of Colorado Preservation Inc. addresses the gathering about their involvement in the depot's restoration starting in 2006 with the listing of the depot on the Colorado's Most Endangered Places List. Following Jennifer, Ann McCleave from History Colorado also spoke. The majority of the grant monies that made the restoration possible came from the Colorado State Historic Fund, administered by History Colorado. Both speakers thanked all those who helped the project along the way.


Bob Schoppe introduces Mike Perschbacher, whose Older Than Dirt Construction was the contractor that managed to take a building on the verge of collapse and turning it into a model of historic preservation.


Debra Queen-Stremke and Patrice Anderson have just cut the ribbon officially dedicating the depot. Debra Queen-Stremke was responsible for listing the Como depot on the Colorado Most Endangered Places list in 2006. Patrice Anderson is Andy Anderson's daughter. The majority of the artifacts on display in the depot came from Andy Anderson. Andy's father was an engineer and Andy worked for the railroad as a helper and accompanied his father on many trips over the line.


Joe Moore sounded an original C&S steam whistle from engine 74 just before the ribbon was cut to put an exclamation point on the ceremony.

C&S engine number 74's original whistle sounds in Como for the first time since 1937!

The large whistle on the left is the original Como roundhouse whistle. The middle one in this view is from C&S engine no. 74.


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